April 19, 2014

The past week has been exhilarating and exhausting for our Kubuntu crew. I'm sure the other *buntu teams were working just as hard. Not just packaging, because that goes on all the time, though not at this intense pace. But the attention to detail, the testing, polishing, patching, discussion with developers to get those patches upstream, coordination with Debian, cleaning up copyright files, man pages and other documentation, making screen shots, our user docs and new website, more testing, more polish.... it was truly an amazing effort.

I used `ubuntu-bug` from the cli more than I ever have before, testing out the betas. It was an amazing experience to file the bug, and then see it fixed within the day! This happened again and again. The entire Ubuntu ecosystem really works well together. My thanks to those developers who read and respond to those bug reports.

What I love about Kubuntu is how everyone pitches in. All of us try to maintain balance in our lives, so that there is time for leisure and enrichment, along with work. Also, the work is fun, because the team enjoys one another, posting fun links, joking around, but continuing to work away on our todo lists. Even those who didn't have time for packaging, often stopped by the devel channel to find out what needed testing. It all helped!

Since I'm not a devel, all this was inspiring rather than exhausting. So I had the time and energy to spend time helping out folks with questions and trouble in #kubuntu and #kde. That felt great! We were able to answer most of the questions, and overcome most of the difficulties.

One issue that came up quite a few times in the last couple of days, was PPAs. On a clean install, of course all old PPAs are blown away. On an upgrade, however, they can linger and cause lots of perplexing problems. Official PPAs like backports are fine, but specialty ones should be removed before upgrading. If you need them, you can always re-add after the upgrade. For the same reason, unpin any packages you have pinned.

It is really fabulous to be able to present the latest KDE software into our Kubuntu LTS. This will give us the freedom to try out the newest stuff from KDE based on the sparkly new Frameworks, Plasma Next and so forth, in our next release. So, our users will be able to use software supported for five years if they want, while also having the option to install 14.10 (if all goes well) and check out the newest.
on April 19, 2014 10:35 PM

UbuconLA is happy to announce that Canonical and the Ubuntu Community will be sponsors in this version 2014.

Also, the Ubuntu Community will be present in the event with members from Spain, India, Uruguay, Venezuela, Mexico, Peru, Colombia, giving talks and workshops… the perfect place to learn a lot about Linux, Ubuntu ,Community, all in this amazing event.

 

 

You can find more information about the UbuconLA in the official site and wikipage


on April 19, 2014 05:57 PM

Today, tweaking the Bootstrap_Walker class used by Melany for another project, I discovered an interesting issue with the title attribute.

Melany allows you to prepend a menu item with an icon coming from the Glyphicon set included in Twitter Bootstrap in a very easy way: just put the glyphicon name in the menu item’s title attribute field and let the Melany do the rest. See an example in the following image:

How to prepend icons to menu items

How to prepend icons to menu items

So, what’s the problem? Well, if you try to define a true title attribute, it won’t work, because the Bootstrap_Walker handles this attribute as if it were an icon. Let me do an example. If you want to set the title attribute to “This link opens in a new tab”, the resulting markup is:

<a href="[menu_item_url]"><span class="glyphicon This link opens in a new tab"></span>&nbsp;[navigation_label]</a>

Of course, you wanted something like this:

<a href="[menu_item_url]" title="This link opens in a new tab">[navigation_label]</a>

I solved this issue with a simple check to see if the word glyphicon is in the title attribute, so you can now use this real attribute without problems. The fix is already in the 1.1.0-dev version, but will soon be released in the 1.0.5 series too.

I hope this has not caused you too many hassles.

Oh, do you know Melany 1.1.0 Alpha2 has been released? Check it out!

on April 19, 2014 05:31 PM

After some last minute critical fixes and ISO respins by the release team (thanks again Infinity, we owe you and the rest of the release team a beer), the Mythbuntu team is proud to announce we have removed our socks (see relevant post) and released Mythbuntu 14.04 LTS. This is the Mythbuntu team's second LTS release and is supported until shortly after the 16.04 release.

With this release, we are providing mirroring on sponsored mirrors and torrents. It is very important to note that this release is only compatible with MythTV 0.27 systems. The MythTV component of previous Mythbuntu releases can be be upgraded to a compatible MythTV version by using the Mythbuntu Repos. For a more detailed explanation, see here.

You can get the Mythbuntu 14.04 ISO from our downloads page.

Highlights

  • MythTV 0.27 (2:0.27.0+fixes.20140324.8ee257c-0ubuntu3)
  • This is our second LTS release (the first being 12.04). See this page for more info.

Underlying system

  • Underlying Ubuntu updates are found here

MythTV

  • Recent snapshot of the MythTV 0.27 release is included (see 0.27 Release Notes)
  • Mythbuntu theme fixes

We appreciated all comments and would love to hear what you think. Please make comments to our mailing list, on the forums (with a tag indicating that this is from 14.04 or trusty), or in #ubuntu-mythtv on Freenode. As previously, if you encounter any issues with anything in this release, please file a bug using the Ubuntu bug tool (ubuntu-bug PACKAGENAME) which automatically collects logs and other important system information, or if that is not possible, directly open a ticket on Launchpad (http://bugs.launchpad.net/mythbuntu/14.04/).

Known issues

  • Upgraders should hold off until our first point (14.04.1) coming this summer. (See bugs #1307546 )
  • Don't select VNC during install. It can be activated later. (Bug #1309752)
  • If you are upgrading and want to use the HTTP Live Streaming you need to create a Streaming storage group
on April 19, 2014 02:04 PM

Hi,

Two days ago, the entire world has celebrated the release of Ubuntu GNOME 14.04 LTS and the other official flavours of Ubuntu.

Ubuntu GNOME Team has received many Emails and Posts on our Social Media Channels about the very same question/issue.

“Why the system information is showing Ubuntu 13.10 instead of Ubuntu 14.04″?!

Same question is being asked daily even before the final release of Ubuntu GNOME 14.04.

Ubuntu GNOME Team is asking everyone to please read the release notes of Ubuntu GNOME 14.04 LTS before downloading or upgrading to Ubuntu GNOME 14.04 LTS.

This is actually a must-do step with any new release/version of any Operating System/Software in the world and to be more specific here, it is a must-do step every time Ubuntu and its official flavours announce a new release every 6 months.

Why reading the release notes is very important?
The answer is very simple: because the release notes will explain everything about the new release and above all, show the known issues for every new release that all users must be aware of before anything else.

Sorry for the inconvenience
Ubuntu GNOME Team would like to apologize if we caused any kind of confusion and/or headache to the users of Ubuntu GNOME. Our Developers are working on the known issues, specially this problem:

System Details shows Ubuntu 13.10 instead of 14.04

A Workaround
Meanwhile, you can check and verify which release/version of Ubuntu GNOME you’re using by following these steps:

How can I find the version of Ubuntu that is installed?

Thank you!
As always, thank you for choosing and using Ubuntu GNOME and thanks for reading this very important note. Please keep that in mind with each and every release, you do need to read the release notes. This will save your time and save the trouble for you and for everyone else.

Enjoy and have fun with Ubuntu GNOME 14.04 LTS

Ali/amjjawad
On behalf of Ubuntu GNOME Team

on April 19, 2014 12:18 PM
We had the Trusty Tahr Release Party today at the University of Liberal Arts Bangladesh (ULAB), Dhaka. It was the official Ubuntu 12.04 release party of Ubuntu Bangladesh LoCo team in cooperation with “ULAB Computer Programming Club”. This time, we did it within two days of … Continue reading
on April 19, 2014 09:56 AM

Hy at PyCon 2014

Paul Tagliamonte

I gave a talk this year at PyCon 2014, about one of my favorite subjects: Hy. Many of my regular readers will have no doubt explored Hy's thriving GitHub org, played with try-hy, or even installed it locally by pip installing it. I was lucky enough to be able to attend PyCon on behalf of Sunlight, with a solid contingint of my colleagues. We put together a writeup on the Sunlight blog if anyone was interested in our favorite talks.

Tons of really amazing questions, and such an amazingly warm reception from so many of my peers throughout this year's PyCon. Thank you so much to everyone that attended the talk. As always, you should Fork Hy on GitHub, follow @hylang on the twitters, and send in any bugs you find!

Hopefully I'll be able to put my talk up in blog-post form soon, but until then feel free to look over the slides or just watch the talk.

An extra shout-out to @akaptur for hacking on Hy during the sprints, and giving the exception system quite the workthrough. Thanks, Allison!

on April 19, 2014 12:13 AM

April 18, 2014

Xspice in containers

Serge Hallyn

For some time I’ve been wanting to run ubuntu-desktop and others, remotely, in containers, using spice. Historically vnc has been the best way to do remote desktops, but spice should provide a far better experience. Unfortunately, Xspice has always failed for me, most recently segfaulting on startup. But fortunately, this is fixed in git, and I’m told a new release may be coming soon. While waiting for the new release (0.12.7?), I pushed a package based on git HEAD to ppa:serge-hallyn/virt.

You can create a container to test this with as follows:

lxc-create -t download -n desk1 -- -d ubuntu -r trusty -a amd64
lxc-start -n desk1 -d
lxc-attach -n desk1

Then inside that container shell,

add-apt-repository ppa:serge-hallyn/virt
apt-get update
apt-get install xserver-xspice ubuntu-desktop

ubuntu-desktop can take awhile to install. You can simply install fvwm and xterm if you want a quicker test. Once that’s all one, copy the xspice configuration file into your home directory, uncompress it, set the SpiceDisableTicketing option (or configure a password), and use the config file to configure an Xorg session:

cp /usr/share/doc/xserver-xspice/spiceqxl.xorg.conf.example.gz /root
cd /root
gunzip spiceqxl.xorg.conf.example.gz
cat >> spiceqxl.xorg.conf.example.gz << EOF
Option "SpiceDisableTicketing" "1"
EOF
/usr/bin/Xorg -config /root/spiceqxl.xorg.conf.example :2 &

Now fire up unity, xterm, or fvwm:

DISPLAY=:2 unity

Now connect using either spicy or spicec,

spicec -h  -p 5900

Of course if the container is on a remote host, you’ll want to set up some ssh port forwards to enable that, but if needed then that’s a subject for another post.


on April 18, 2014 08:12 PM

A little radiation goes a long way.

Your microwave can be used for more than reheating coffee.

It is far more versatile a device, for instance, you can make these fat-free potato chips ("crisps" for you British gentlepeople) in one with very little effort.

    Ingredients

  • 1 potato,
  • sea salt, to taste
  • any other seasoning or spice that you'd like to flavour the chips with.
  • Needed Equipment

  • Microwave
  • Useful Equipment

  • a mandoline –brilliant thing to have, even a sub-$20 will do
  • a silicon sheet –for a non-stick surface in the microwave, I recommend the brand "Silpat"

    Directions

  1. Thinly cut the potato into even, 2-3 millimeter slices.
  2. Here, a mandoline is incredibly useful (even perhaps ideal or necessary).
  3. Rinse the excess starch off the potato slices and shake/pat/spin off the excess water.
  4. Place the slices onto a non-stick microwave-safe (no metals!) sheet, without overlap.
  5. Microwave on high power for 2 minutes. This'll remove a lot of the water in the potato and you'll begin to see them browning.
  6. Flip the slices and microwave for another minute. Keep an eye on them while they're in there to prevent burning.
  7. Remove any nicely browned chips.
  8. For any not fully done, zap on high in 10 second intervals until they too are browned.
  9. Season with salt, to your tastes, and/or any other thing really.
  10. Enjoy, guilt-free. :)
on April 18, 2014 08:00 PM

PLUMgrid , the leader in Virtual Network Infrastructure (VNI), today announced that PLUMgrid VNI 3.0 has achieved certification for Red Hat Enterprise Linux OpenStack Platform . The certification ensures that PLUMgrid VNI 3.0 has been integrated, tested and certified for use with Red Hat Enterprise Linux OpenStack Platform.
PLUMgrid VNI 3.0 is a secure virtual networking product for large-scale OpenStack clouds. Built using PLUMgrid Platform and IO Visor™ technology , it provides an easy and simple solution to build cloud infrastructure at scale and offer secure, multi-tenant network services to OpenStack cloud users. Based on a highly automated workflow, PLUMgrid VNI 3.0 enables applications and users to deploy private Virtual Domains™ in seconds without changing the physical network fabric.

Source:

http://www.marketwatch.com/story/plumgrid-virtual-network-infrastructure-achieves-certification-for-red-hat-enterprise-linux-openstack-platform-2014-04-14

on April 18, 2014 07:18 PM

IBM says that now is great time for KVM (Kernel-based Virtual Machine) technology as a result of key contributions from its large developer community.
The KVM hypervisor is an open source virtualization technology and, increasingly, it is becoming an important tool in any Linux user’s handbook, especially in light of OpenStack.
KVM is a full virtualization solution for Linux on x86 hardware containing virtualization extensions (Intel VT or AMD-V) and consisting of a loadable kernel module (kvm.ko) that provides the core virtualization infrastructure and a processor-specific module (kvm-intel.ko) or (kvm-amd.ko).
IBM says that hypervisors have had to better manage compute, network, and storage resources — and that this need that has been fulfilled by KVM.

Source:

http://www.drdobbs.com/open-source/ibm-now-is-the-time-for-kvm/240167057

on April 18, 2014 07:17 PM




This article is cross-posted on Docker's blog as well.

There is a design pattern, occasionally found in nature, when some of the most elegant and impressive solutions often seem so intuitive, in retrospect.



For me, Docker is just that sort of game changing, hyper-innovative technology, that, at its core,  somehow seems straightforward, beautiful, and obvious.



Linux containers, repositories of popular base images, snapshots using modern copy-on-write filesystem features.  Brilliant, yet so simple.  Docker.io for the win!


I clearly recall nine long months ago, intrigued by a fervor of HackerNews excitement pulsing around a nascent Docker technology.  I followed a set of instructions on a very well designed and tastefully manicured web page, in order to launch my first Docker container.  Something like: start with Ubuntu 13.04, downgrade the kernel, reboot, add an out-of-band package repository, install an oddly named package, import some images, perhaps debug or ignore some errors, and then launch.  In few moments, I could clearly see the beginnings of a brave new world of lightning fast, cleanly managed, incrementally saved, highly dense, operating system containers.

Ubuntu inside of Ubuntu, Inception style.  So.  Much.  Potential.



Fast forward to today -- April 18, 2014 -- and the combination of Docker and Ubuntu 14.04 LTS has raised the bar, introducing a new echelon of usability and convenience, and coupled with the trust and track record of enterprise grade Long Term Support from Canonical and the Ubuntu community.
Big thanks, by the way, to Paul Tagliamonte, upstream Debian packager of Docker.io, as well as all of the early testers and users of Docker during the Ubuntu development cycle.
Docker is now officially in Ubuntu.  That makes Ubuntu 14.04 LTS the first enterprise grade Linux distribution to ship with Docker natively packaged, continuously tested, and instantly installable.  Millions of Ubuntu servers are now never more than three commands away from launching or managing Linux container sandboxes, thanks to Docker.


sudo apt-get install docker.io
sudo docker.io pull ubuntu
sudo docker.io run -i -t ubuntu /bin/bash


And after that last command, Ubuntu is now officially running within Docker, inside of a Linux container.

Brilliant.

Simple.

Elegant.

User friendly.

Just the way we like things in Ubuntu, thanks to our friends at Docker.io!


Cheers,
:-Dustin
on April 18, 2014 07:11 PM
HUD shown over terminal app with commands visible

Most expert users know how powerful the command line is on their Ubuntu system, but one of the common criticisms of it is that the commands themselves are hard to discover and remember the exact syntax for. To help a little bit with this I've created a small patch to the Ubuntu Terminal which adds entries into the HUD so that they can be searched by how people might think of the feature. Hopefully this will provide a way to introduce people to the command line, and provide experienced users with some commands that they might have not known about on their Ubuntu Phone. Let's look at one of the commands I added:

UnityActions.Action {
  text: i18n.tr("Networking Status")
  keywords: i18n.tr("Wireless;Ethernet;Access Points")
  onTriggered: ksession.sendText("\x03\nnm-tool\n")
}

This command quite simply prints out the status of the networking on the device. But some folks probably don't think of it as networking, they just want to search for the wireless status. By using the HUD keywords feature we're able to add a list of other possible search strings for the command. Now someone can type wireless status into the HUD and figure out the command that they need. This is a powerful way to discover new functionality. Plus (and this is really important) these can all be translated into their local language.

It is tradition in my family to spend this weekend looking for brightly colored eggs that have been hidden. If you update your terminal application I hope you'll be able to enjoy the same tradition this weekend.

on April 18, 2014 05:46 PM

So at last it’s here. Ubuntu 14.04 LTS

And I have to say ‘Thank you’ for pushing this out.

I am running Trusty Tahr for a long time now, while it was still in development on my workstation. And it’s one of the best releases so far.

Even during development only some glitches were encountered, but were easily workarounded, and this is actually pretty amazing.

When you followed Ubuntu for some years now (and to some extend also invovled in pushing software to it), you know that this wasn’t always the case.

We had a couple of really serious hickups, but this release was very handsome. I think Canonicals push towards automated QA and the upload pocket behaviour change were the right things to do.

Thanks Guys, for delivering this amazing release. You really can celebrate and drink a lot of booze and have a good meal (well, now that Jono is the definitive Ubuntu Smoker King, he could serve some delicious pulled pork or whatever he is able to smoke ;))

Again, thank you, you all know who you are. You guys are amazing. Rock On!

on April 18, 2014 03:13 PM

You never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view — until you climb into his skin and walk around in it.
–To Kill a Mockingbird, Atticus Finch

These aren’t purely my thoughts. I’m sure I read something somewhere that sparked them, but I don’t have a link or citation, so I’m just being honest that I am not the source of all that I have written here, although I am using my words. Oh, and great book.

I’ve been thinking about this. I love the idea and I will always strive to learn about and understand other’s perspectives. But, I feel inadequate, like if I am to be honest, I really cannot do this. Not completely, anyway.

No matter how hard we try, we will each still see things with some skewing from your own perspective. We can never really know what it’s like to be that other person.

When you hear, see, or experience other people’s lives you may try to put yourself in their shoes and consider how you would deal with life as it has been dealt to them. That is noble.

However, it is impossible for us to actually do so. We hear, see, and experience things differently and our history and emotional, spiritual, mental, and intellectual makeup and status affect that. We each create our own reality based on our experiences filtered through all those layers of what we call self.

You can live with someone your/their whole life but that doesn’t mean you really understand their perspective. You may know intimate details or have a pretty good idea of what the other person is likely to think or do in certain situations based on past responses and patterns of behavior, but that is not really the same thing.

No matter how much we think we do, we are unable to climb fully into the mind and perspective of someone else. We are all made up of our perceptions, experiences of success and failures, societal programming, genders, and more. Humans are complex

To fully grasp another person’s perspective in its purest form we would have to wipe clear all of who we are and then copy over to ourselves who the other person is. It is not possible to eliminate our biases this way.

I’m starting to think that we can never really climb inside someone else’s skin, but we can hope to acquire a better understanding. The attempt is worth the effort, even if it can never be complete. We can learn to walk beside someone else. We can attempt to see things from their perspective. In doing so, we each hope we gave and gained something from it, drawing each of us a little bit closer to the other.

on April 18, 2014 01:26 PM
Yesterday I started work on an app that I personally want to use. I don't have a car, so I use services like Metro Bus, Metro Rail, Car2Go, and BikeShare around DC all the time. It's annoying to go to each different web page or app to get the information that I want, so I decided to write an app that combines it all for me in one place.

After asking around, I settled on a best practice for Ubuntu map apps, and I was pointed to this excellent code as a basis:
http://bazaar.launchpad.net/~yohanboniface/osmtouch/trunk/view/head:/OSMTouch.qml

It was so easy and fun once I got started, that I decided to show the world. So, here we go.

I started with a "Simple UI" project. Then I deleted the default column that it started with, and I set the title of the Page to an empty string. While I was at it, I changed the height and width to be more like a phone's dimensions to make testing a little easier. So my starter code for an emply Window looks like this:
 import QtQuick 2.0  
import Ubuntu.Components 0.1
import "components"
MainView {
objectName: "mainView"
applicationName: "com.ubuntu.developer.rick-rickspencer3.MapExample"
width: units.gu(40)
height: units.gu(60)
Page
{
title: i18n.tr("")
}
}
So what's missing now is a map. First I need to import the parts of Qt where I get location and map information, so I add these imports:
 import QtPositioning 5.2  
import QtLocation 5.0
Then I can use the Map tag to add a Map to the MainView. I do four things in the Map to make it show up. First, I tell it to fill it's parent (normal for any component). Then I set it's center property. I choose to do this using a coordinate. Note that you can't make a coordinate in a declarative way, you have to construct it like below. The center property tells the map the latitude and longitude to be centered on. Then I choose the zoom level, which determines the scale of the map. Finally, I need to specify the plug in. For various reasons, I choose to use the Open Street Maps plugin, though feel free to experiment with others. So, a basic funcitonal map looks like this:
   Page  
{
title: i18n.tr("")
Map
{
anchors.fill: parent
center: QtPositioning.coordinate(38.87, -77.045)
zoomLevel: 13
plugin: Plugin { name: "osm"}
}
}
When I run it, I get a lot of functionality for free. On the desktop I can drag the map, and when I run the app on my phone or tablet, I can pinch to zoom in or out. All that functionality comes for free. Of course, you are free to add mapping controls as desired, but I find that map works well out of the box, at least on a device that supports pinch and zoom.


Typically, a map displays little pinpoints. These are often referred to as Points of Interest, or more typically "POI". It's delightfully easy to populate your map with POI using our old friend XmlListModel. First, you will need some XML that has location information. For this exmaple, I am going to use the Bike Share feed for Washington, DC. It's easy to get and to parse, so it makes a nice example. You can see the feed here:
https://www.capitalbikeshare.com/data/stations/bikeStations.xml

So let's use it to set up our XmlListModel. First, of course, we need to import the XmlListModel functionality.


 import QtQuick.XmlListModel 2.0  
Next, we'll make the list model, and use the query and Roles functionality to set up the model with the latitude and longitude of each POI inside the model. This is *exactly* like using the XmlListModel for a typical list view. Very cool.
   XmlListModel  
{
id: bikeStationModel
source: "https://www.capitalbikeshare.com/data/stations/bikeStations.xml"
query: "/stations/station"
XmlRole { name: "lat"; query: "lat/string()"; isKey: true }
XmlRole { name: "lng"; query: "long/string()"; isKey: true }
}
Now that I have my list model set up, it's time to display them on the Map. We don't do that with a ListView, but rather wtih a MapItemView. This works exactly the same as a ListView, except it displays items on a map instead of in a list. Just like a ListView I need a delegate that will translate use data from the each item in the XmlListModel to create a UI element. In this case, it's a MapQuickItem instead of a ListItem (or similar). A MapQuickItem needs to know 4 things.

  1. The model where it will get the data. In this case, it's my XmlListModel, but it could be a javascript list or other model as well.
  2. A latitude and longitude for the POI, which I set up as roles in the XmlListModel.
  3. An offset for whatever I am using for POI so that it is positioned properly. In this case I have made a little pushpin image out of the bikeshare logo (I know it's bad I'll make a better one later :) ). The offset is set by anchorPoint, so I make the anchorPoint the bottom and center of of the pushpin. 
  4. Something to use for the POI. In this case, I choose to use an image. Note that it is important to use grid units, or the POI may appear too small on some devices, and too large on others. Grid Units make them "just right" on all devices, and ensure that users can click them on any device. 


So, here is my MapItemView that goes *inside* the Map tag. It's a MapItemView for the map, after all.

       MapItemView  
{
model: bikeStationModel
delegate: MapQuickItem
{
id: poiItem
coordinate: QtPositioning.coordinate(lat,lng)
anchorPoint.x: poiImage.width * 0.5
anchorPoint.y: poiImage.height
sourceItem: Image
{
id: poiImage
width: units.gu(2)
height: units.gu(2)
source: "bike_poi.png"
}
}
}
Now when I run the app, the POI are displayed. As you would expect, when the user moves the Map, the MapItemView automatically displays the correct POI. It's really that easy.


If you want to add interactivity, that's easy, you can simply add a MouseArea to the Image and then use things like Ubuntu.Components.Popups to popup additional information about the POI. 


This sample code is here: http://bazaar.launchpad.net/~rick-rickspencer3/+junk/MapExample/view/head:/MapExample.qml
on April 18, 2014 01:10 PM

Kubuntu 14.04 LTS was released yesterday along with the all new KDE SC 4.13.  Browsing around the internet this morning the feedback feels really good.  Here’s some of my favourite quotes.

spiros spiros on Google+

Thank you for this great release :)

César J. Pinto on Google+

My God… I’m very surprise with kubuntu… it feels more fast than unity and gnome. wow…. I just…. i have no words to describe my happiness :D

@srikrishnaholla on Twitter

Downloading #kubuntu 14.04 LTS. Man, I’ve missed #kde !

 

@gholmer on Twitter
 

Get it while it’s hot! Newest Ubuntu with the king of desktop environments, KDE! #kubuntu http://www.kubuntu.org

@apachelogger on Twitter [OK he's not entirely neutral]

This is the best release so far! Such awesome, so #Kubuntu 14.04 LTS! http://goo.gl/jQFdZJ  #bestreleaseever

@jotakinhan on Twitter

Using #kubuntu again after using other distros for long time and its great!

@LowEndGeek on Twitter

Re-visiting #kde on #kubuntu 14.04 Working much better than regular #ubuntu

One of the first reviews was on Tux Arena:

“It is a beautiful release and it will definitely be here to stay for quite some time”

And in my inbox:

From: Robert Kovacs

Subject: Excellent Release Kubuntu 14.04

Date: Fri, 18 Apr 2014 00:15:33 -0400

Thanks for all the hard work!. Kudos to the Kubuntu team. Just installed     Kubuntu 14.04 and everything is working fine. Was using Kubuntu 12.04.3,    which was also a great release.

Cheers!.
Bob Kovacs (USA)

on April 18, 2014 11:50 AM

Just finished up the first draft of an Installfest worksheet.  Let me know what you think…

XP to Ubuntu Worksheet

on April 18, 2014 05:20 AM

April 17, 2014

My apologies in advance for the shorter blog post about this, but like many other Ubuntu folks, I am absolutely exhausted right now. Everyone, across the board, has been working their collective socks off to make Ubuntu 14.04 LTS a fantastic release on desktop, server, and cloud, and pull together our next iteration of Ubuntu for smart-phones and tablets. Consequently, when the trigger is pulled to share our final product with the world, release day is often less of a blistering and energetic woo-hoo, but more of an exhausted but satisfying oh-yeah (complete with beer firmly clenched in hand).

I am hugely proud of this release. The last six months have arguably been our busiest yet. No longer are we just working on desktop and server editions of Ubuntu, but we are building for the cloud and full convergence across the client. No longer are we “just” pulling together the fruits of upstream software projects but we are building our own platform too; the Ubuntu SDK, developer eco-system, charm store, image-based updates, push notifications, app lifecycle, and more. While the work has been intense and at times frantic, it has always been measured and carefully executed. Much of this has been thanks to many of our most under-thanked people; the members of our tremendous QA and CI teams.

Today, tomorrow, and for weeks to come our users, the press, the industry, and others will assess our work in Ubuntu 14.04 across these different platforms, and I am very confident they will love what they see. Ubuntu 14.04 embodies the true spirit of Ubuntu; innovation, openness, and people.

But as we wait to see the reviews let’s take a moment for each other. Now is a great time to reach out to each other and those Ubuntu folks you know (and don’t know) and share some kudos, some thanks, and some great stories. Until we get to the day where machines make software, today software is made by people and great software is built by great people.

Thanks everyone for every ounce of effort you fed into Ubuntu and our many flavors. We just took another big leap forward towards our future.

on April 17, 2014 10:58 PM
on April 17, 2014 10:19 PM

Trust in Trusty 14.04 LTS

Jonathan Riddell

KDE Project:


Trust in Me

You've been waiting for it, we've been working hard on it.. it's the new Long Term Support release of Kubuntu!

This means we've been working hard on removing bugs, polishing features and not adding new ones. This will probably be the last release before KDE Frameworks 5 and Plasma Next gets introduced so for those who like to live life on the cautious side you'll be pleased to know the Long Term Support label means we'll have important bug fixes and security fixes for the next 5 years. It'll also get backports of important KDE software for the next couple of years.


But that doesn't mean there's nothing new. Take a look at the release announcement for a long list. For one thing we're the first distro to ship with KDE SC 4.13 fresh out today. It brings a much nicer desktop search capability that makes search fly.

Muon is slicker, all new Driver Manager means hardware works better, Gwenview plugins mean it's easier to upload to Facebook, KDE Connect makes your phone talk to your laptop.

All wrapped up with the safety of commercial support if you need it and plenty of community support if you need that.

I'd like to thank Harald who put in a lot of effort in this release, even writing up release notes which I've never found anyone to help with before. Rohan did crutial last minute bugfixes including at the last minute and nifty new features like the Driver Manager. Aurelien took care of Ubiquity to get your installs looking nice. We've all new documentation thanks to Aaron and Valerie and others. Scott kept the policy ticking over. Phillip got things packaged, debfx had bug fixes when it was needed most, Michal keeping an eye on the important packages, Scarlett being the Queen of packaging for KF5 and others. Really what a wonderful team effort.

And next? We'll be looking at making KDE Frameworks usable, Plasma 2014.6 may be the next desktop and who knows we may even get something working with Wayland. it's exiting! Come and join us, chat in #kubuntu-devel and join the kubuntu-devel mailing list.

on April 17, 2014 10:16 PM

I’m pleased to announce the general availability of OpenStack 2014.1 (Icehouse) in Ubuntu 14.04 LTS and in the Ubuntu Cloud Archive (UCA) for Ubuntu 12.04 LTS.

Users of Ubuntu 14.04 need take no further action other than follow their favourite install guide – but do take some time to checkout the release notes for Ubuntu 14.04.

Ubuntu 12.04 users can enable the Icehouse pocket of the UCA by running:

sudo add-apt-repository cloud-archive:icehouse

The Icehouse pocket of the UCA also includes updates for associated packages including Ceph 0.79 (which will be updated to the Ceph 0.80 Firefly stable release), Open vSwitch 2.0.1, qemu 2.0.0 and libvirt 1.2.2 – you can checkout the full list here.

Thanks goes to all of the people who have contributed to making OpenStack rock this release cycle – both upstream and in Ubuntu!

Remember that you can report bugs on packages from the UCA for Ubuntu 12.04 and from Ubuntu 14.04 using the ubuntu-bug tool – for example:

ubuntu-bug nova

will report the bug in the right place on launchpad and add some basic information about your installation.

The Juju charms for OpenStack have also been updated to support deployment of OpenStack Icehouse on Ubuntu 14.04 and Ubuntu 12.04.  Read the charm release notes for more details on the new features that have been enabled during this development cycle.

Canonical have a more concise install guide in the pipeline for deploying OpenStack using Juju and MAAS  – watch this space for more information…

EOM

 


on April 17, 2014 09:51 PM

14.04 Release Today

Svetlana Belkin

Stephen Michael Kellat asked me to post this:

Greetings Ohio.

As this is sent, the release announcement for Ubuntu and its many flavors is not up yet. Please take the time to download the 14.04 Long Term Support Release and to liberally seed torrents if you can. So far Xubuntu 14.04 has been wonderful and I am an “apt-get dist-upgrade” away from transitioning off beta to final on my installed base.

Discs for distribution have **not** been pre-ordered. If there is interest in doing a disc distribution campaign, please talk to the three Deputies about making a plan. I will not order discs to just have lay around gathering dust.

Have a great Thursday. Svetlana Belkin, James Gifford, Unit193…I leave the celebrations for you to lead. Svetlana, please post a copy of this message to your blog with such comment as you deem fit. My duties at work plus commute time prevent my celebrating much for this release on release day.

Stephen Michael Kellat
Point of Contact/Leader, Ubuntu Ohio
Member, LoCo Council

As for me, I have Ubuntu 14.04 32 bit on one of my laptops and I will have a review of Ubuntu 14.04 up soon.


on April 17, 2014 09:30 PM
While doing final QA testing of the image, the Mythbuntu team found a few release critical bugs. Despite our best efforts we were unable to resolve these issues in time so today we made the tough decision and decided to pull the ISO that was to be released.

We would like to congratulate the other Ubuntu Flavors on their 14.04 releases and have plans to join them with our 14.04 release in the next week. We would also like to thank all of our users for their patience and their continued support.

Critical Bugs


on April 17, 2014 08:15 PM

The Ubuntu GNOME Team is proud and happy to announce the release of Ubuntu GNOME 14.04 LTS.

Ubuntu GNOME is an official flavour of Ubuntu, featuring the GNOME desktop environment. Ubuntu GNOME is a mostly pure GNOME desktop experience built from the Ubuntu repositories. This is our very first Long Term Release (LTS) version.

Release Notes

Please read the Release Notes before Downloading Ubuntu GNOME 14.04 LTS:
https://wiki.ubuntu.com/TrustyTahr/ReleaseNotes/UbuntuGNOME

Get Ubuntu GNOME 14.04 LTS

There are important steps you need to be aware of before installing Ubuntu GNOME 14.04 LTS so please read carefully: Download Ubuntu GNOME 14.04 LTS

Ubuntu Announcement and Release Notes

Please see this link.

Contact Us

Please, see the full list of our communications channels

Thank you everyone

To each and everyone who participated, helped, supported and contributed to Ubuntu GNOME this cycle; big thanks to all of you.

Ubuntu GNOME Team has gone the extra miles by putting extraordinary efforts to the point, the team was ready to apply for the LTS Status. We have done all what we could to achieve that and indeed we have and therefore, we gained and deserved the LTS Status. Without a doubt, that is a huge achievement in our history.

Special thanks to our testers who did a unique great job to make Ubuntu GNOME better. As a result of all these efforts, we have a great LTS release to be proud of.

Thank you for choosing and using Ubuntu GNOME.

Ali/amjjawad
QA Lead of Ubuntu GNOME

on April 17, 2014 07:19 PM

The Ubuntu team is very pleased to announce our fifth long-term support release, Ubuntu 14.04 LTS for Desktop, Server, Cloud, and Core, as well as Ubuntu 14.04 for Phone and Tablet products.

Codenamed "Trusty Tahr", 14.04 LTS continues Ubuntu’s proud tradition of integrating the latest and greatest open source technologies into a high-quality, easy-to-use Linux distribution. The team has been hard at work through this cycle, introducing new features and fixing bugs.

Ubuntu 14.04 LTS is the first long-term support release with support for the new "arm64" architecture for 64-bit ARM systems, as well as the "ppc64el" architecture for little-endian 64-bit POWER systems. This release also includes several subtle but welcome improvements to Unity, AppArmor, and a host of other great software.

Ubuntu Server 14.04 LTS includes the Icehouse release of OpenStack, alongside deployment and management tools that save devops teams time when deploying distributed applications – whether on private clouds, public clouds, x86 or ARM servers, or on developer laptops. Several key server technologies, from MAAS to Ceph, have been updated to new upstream versions with a variety of new features.

The newest Kubuntu, Edubuntu, Xubuntu, Lubuntu, Ubuntu GNOME, Ubuntu Kylin, and Ubuntu Studio are also being released today. More details can be found for these at their individual release notes:

https://wiki.ubuntu.com/TrustyTahr/ReleaseNotes#Official_flavours

Maintenance updates will be provided for 5 years for Ubuntu Desktop, Ubuntu Server, Ubuntu Cloud, Ubuntu Core, Ubuntu Kylin, Edubuntu, and Kubuntu. All the remaining flavours will be supported for 3 years.

To get Ubuntu 14.04 LTS

In order to download Ubuntu 14.04 LTS, visit:

http://www.ubuntu.com/download

Users of Ubuntu 12.10 and 13.10 will be offered an automatic upgrade to 14.04 LTS via Update Manager shortly. Users of 12.04 LTS will be offered the automatic upgrade when 14.04.1 LTS is released, which is scheduled for July 24th. For further information about upgrading, see:

http://www.ubuntu.com/download/desktop/upgrade

As always, upgrades to the latest version of Ubuntu are entirely free of charge.

We recommend that all users read the release notes, which document caveats, workarounds for known issues, as well as more in-depth notes on the release itself. They are available at:

http://wiki.ubuntu.com/TrustyTahr/ReleaseNotes

Find out what’s new in this release with a graphical overview:

http://www.ubuntu.com/desktop
http://www.ubuntu.com/desktop/features

If you have a question, or if you think you may have found a bug but aren’t sure, you can try asking in any of the following places:

#ubuntu on irc.freenode.net
http://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-users
http://www.ubuntuforums.org
http://askubuntu.com

Help Shape Ubuntu

If you would like to help shape Ubuntu, take a look at the list of ways you can participate at:

http://www.ubuntu.com/community/get-involved

About Ubuntu

Ubuntu is a full-featured Linux distribution for desktops, laptops, netbooks and servers, with a fast and easy installation and regular releases. A tightly-integrated selection of excellent applications is included, and an incredible variety of add-on software is just a few clicks away.

Professional services including support are available from Canonical and hundreds of other companies around the world. For more information about support, visit:

http://www.ubuntu.com/support

More Information

You can learn more about Ubuntu and about this release on our website listed below:

http://www.ubuntu.com

To sign up for future Ubuntu announcements, please subscribe to Ubuntu’s very low volume announcement list at:

http://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-announce

Originally posted to the ubuntu-announce mailing list on Thu Apr 17 17:09:54 UTC 2014 by Adam Conrad

on April 17, 2014 06:14 PM

The Kubuntu and KDE team has been hard at work for the last 6 months, which has culminated into a rocking Kubuntu 14.04 release which introduces a whole bunch of new features, the most important of which are :

  • A new semantic search framework for KDE SC 4.13, leading to faster email and file searches
  • Automatic error reporting in order to improve the quality of KDE and Kubuntu
  • A new driver manager to make it simpler to activate hardware that requires proprietary drivers
  • Notifications for when additional drivers or language packs can be installed to improve your Kubuntu experience
  • A new touchpad management app for laptops
  • Misc. bug fixes and features that can be found here

Kubuntu 14.04 is a LTS release, so while introducing new applications, we’ve also taken into account personal and business users who would want to run it for extended periods of time, which is why the Kubuntu team makes the following promise :

  • Kubuntu 14.04 will keep receiving security bug fixes when such fixes are available from KDE upstream for the next 5 years
  • New releases of the KDE SC will be backported to 14.04 and be available via Kubuntu PPA’s for the next 2 years
  • A long-term upgrade path to the next LTS release

Along with the above, the Ubuntu team also has plans to backport new Xorg and friends releases as well as new kernel releases as part of their LTS Enablement stack, making sure that your hardware performance keeps improving over the time of 5 years.

All of this makes Kubuntu the ideal distribution to use for enterprise rollouts, OEM’s and of course regular users who want a longer support cycle ( as opposed to the regular, 9 month, support cycle )

You can download your copy of Kubuntu 14.04 from here. We also have some Kubuntu swag that you can purchase over here!


on April 17, 2014 06:09 PM

Welcome to Kubuntu 14.04 LTS, a brand new Long Term Supported version with the latest KDE software to enjoy.

Long Term Support means bugfixes and security updates will be added for the next 5 years, so you can be safe to use it until 2019. New releases of important KDE Software will also be available from the Kubuntu Updates and Kubuntu Backports PPAs.

on April 17, 2014 06:00 PM

Welcome to Edubuntu 14.04 LTS!

The Edubuntu development team announces today the release of Edubuntu 14.04 LTS.

As the second Long Term Support release of the Edubuntu, this version will be supported for 5 years, until April 2019. The Edubuntu development team will also provide "point releases" in sync with Ubuntu to offer you new installation media containing all the latest bug fixes and hardware enablement stacks.

Please visit the download page for information on how to obtain it.

What's new ?

As usual, Edubuntu inherits most of the changes that occur in Ubuntu.
Additionally, this release brings you:

  • Epoptes 0.5.7, an update to the popular classroom management software suite.
  • New major version of LTSP (5.5.x), including numerous bugfixes, speed improvement, lowering bandwidth requirements and improving fat client support.

Edubuntu inherits new features from Ubuntu 14.04, please read the full release notes for a listing of the latest features and issues.

How do I get it ?

The DVD image (also usable as a USB image) is downloadable from our download page.

Installation instructions are available here.

If you already have an Ubuntu or Ubuntu based system installed, you can simply install any additional Edubuntu packages that you would like to use from the Software Center.

Users of Edubuntu 13.10 as well as fully up to date users from the 12.04 series can upgrade directly to 14.04.

Further Information

Community support is available via IRC, Forums and Mailing lists.
Please refer to http://edubuntu.org/documentation for more information.

About Edubuntu

The Edubuntu project aims to maintain high quality educational and related packages in Ubuntu. Additionally, we also produce the Edubuntu DVD, which aims to be an easy to use Ubuntu system designed for home and classroom use.

For more information, see: About Edubuntu

on April 17, 2014 05:27 PM

S07E03 – The One with the Cake

Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo

Alan Pope, Mark Johnson, Tony Whitmore, and Laura Cowen are in Studio L for Season Seven, Episode Three of the Ubuntu Podcast!

In this week’s show:-

We’ll be back next week, when we’ll review the Ubuntu 14.04 release and go through your feedback.

Please send your comments and suggestions to: podcast@ubuntu-uk.org
Join us on IRC in #uupc on Freenode
Leave a voicemail via phone: +44 (0) 203 298 1600, sip: podcast@sip.ubuntu-uk.org and skype: ubuntuukpodcast
Follow our twitter feed http://twitter.com/uupc
Find our Facebook Fan Page
Follow us on Google Plus

on April 17, 2014 05:12 PM

Replacing Ubuntu One

Charles Profitt

Options:
As many of you know Canonical has decided to discontinue the Ubuntu One files. In my testing I have not yet decided what service to replace Ubuntu One with, but I have currently migrated all my files to OneDrive from Microsoft by making use of Storage Made Easy. Storage Made Easy has clients for Windows, Linux, OS X and mobile clients, but you can migrate files between services using their web interface as well. With a free account you can add up to three providers. Due to bandwidth limits I doubt I will use the service as my replacement, but it did allow me to transfer the files to OneDrive as a temporary home while I figure out what I will use in the future.

In the process of migrating files to Microsoft’s service I noticed what I assume is an oversight by Canonical. The Ubuntu One site does not have any notification that it is shutting down. Below are some screen shots.

Screenshot from 2014-04-16 19:20:00

worse is I can still click on sign-up without being told the file services are being discontinued.

Screenshot from 2014-04-16 19:41:34I sent an email to a Canonical employee and I hope this oversight will be correctly swiftly.


on April 17, 2014 12:10 AM

April 16, 2014

Finding a Tahr (or two!)

Elizabeth Krumbach Joseph

Tomorrow the next Ubuntu Long Term Support (LTS) release comes out, 14.04, development code name Trusty Tahr. In preparation, I was putting together some materials for our release event next week and found myself looking for the Tahr artwork when I remembered that it was included in the installer. So now I’ll share it with you as well!

If you go to this source page you will see a “download file” link which will allow you to download a .png of the tahr artwork.

Trusty Tahr

I haven’t found an svg version of this logo, but I’ll be sure to update this post if I do.

Looking for something slightly different? The Xubuntu team also included a tahr in our installer, created by Simon Steinbeiß:


This png has transparency, which make it show grey on white, but you can flavor it with any color you wish!

You can grab it at this source page where you will see the “download file” link. I’ve also uploaded the svg: art_tahr.svg

Enjoy! And happy release everyone!

on April 16, 2014 10:16 PM

We’ve been trying to get our Java developer story in order, as it’s one of the areas where users have been telling us they’d like to see made easier to manage. We brought Matthew Bruzek on board, who will be focusing on our Java framework stuff.

Here’s his first cut, and it’s a big one. We now finally have an all emcompassing Apache Tomcat Charm. This charm allows you to develop your app on top of it as a subordinate charm and be able to deploy it. As an example, let’s deploy OpenMRS.

juju deploy tomcat7
juju deploy openmrs
juju deploy mysql
juju add-relation openmrs mysql
juju add-relation openmrs tomcat7
juju expose tomcat7

The magic happens when you relate openmrs to tomcat7, that installs OpenMRS in Tomcat, and then you’re good to go.

The charm contains a ton of options for you to check out, including deploying to Tomcat6 if that’s how you roll.

Those of you looking for “just shove my war file out there” can check out Robert Ayre’s j2ee-deployer charm. Here’s a blog post on how to use it.

That one is not in the charm store yet, but we’ll get to it!

on April 16, 2014 01:23 PM
Xubuntu 14.04 Trusty Tahr

Xubuntu 14.04 Trusty Tahr

The Xubuntu team is pleased to announce the immediate release of Xubuntu 14.04. Xubuntu 14.04 is an LTS (Long-Term Support) release and will be supported for 3 years.

The final release images are available as Torrents and direct downloads at http://cdimage.ubuntu.com/xubuntu/releases/14.04/release/

As the main server will be very busy in the first days after the release, we recommend using the Torrents wherever possible.

For support with the release, navigate to Help & Support for a complete list of methods to get help.

Highlights, changes and known issues

The highlights of this release include:

  • Light Locker replaces xscreensaver for screen locking, a setting editing GUI is included
  • The panel layout is updated, and now uses Whiskermenu as the default menu
  • Mugshot is included to allow you to easily edit your personal preferences
  • MenuLibre for menu editing, with full Xfce support, replaces Alacarte
  • A community wallpapers package, which includes work from the five winners of the wallpaper contest
  • GTK Theme Config to customize your desktop theme colors
  • Updated artwork, including various enhancements to themes as well as a new default wallpaper

Some of the known issues include:

  • Xfce4 Power Manager does not restore screen power (1259339), see the release notes for details and workarounds
  • Window manager shortcut keys don’t work after reboot (1292290)
  • Sorting by date or name not working correctly in Ristretto (1270894)
  • Due to the switch from xscreensaver to light-locker, some users might have issues with timing of locking; removing xscreensaver from the system should fix these problems
  • IBus does not support certain keyboard layouts (1284635). Only affects upgrades with certain keyboard layouts. See release notes for a workaround.

To see the complete list of new features, improvements and known and fixed bugs, read the release notes.

Other efforts and thanks

As always, contributors to Xubuntu have worked on various projects not directly visible in the release. While any of these would be worth mentioning, the following are a few we felt may be of interest to the community:

  • QA efforts, including ISO and package testing as well as bug reporting and triaging
  • Marketing projects, including work on a flyer to promote Xubuntu for people still running Windows XP
  • Website updates, including a theme refresh

While many of the improvements in Xubuntu since the last LTS are, indeed, not directly visible. Some of the major improvements have been in design and theming, and as such we hope that you don’t see them – good design should be invisible.

Thanks to everybody contributing to Xubuntu! As always, new contributors are always welcome to join us. There are various different tasks to do, from testing daily ISOs and new package versions to writing and translating documentation to fixing bugs. To learn more about contributing, read the Get Involved section on the Xubuntu website.

on April 16, 2014 10:29 AM

Start up the hype machine!  We’re going to take a look at what’s coming in Xubuntu 14.04.

With only two days before final release, let’s take a look at what’s new in the next LTS release of Xubuntu.  Here’s 14 things that make the biggest splash this time around.

New Look

  1. Brand new theme for the LightDM GTK+ Greeter login/lock screen.

    LightDM GTK+ Greeter with the latest Greybird theme.

    LightDM GTK+ Greeter with the latest Greybird theme.

  2. A new “Suru”-styled default wallpaper.

    The new default wallpaper for Xubuntu 14.04

    The new default wallpaper for Xubuntu 14.04 “Trusty Tahr”

  3. Six wallpapers were selected from a pool of community-submitted wallpapers and included.  See each of the winning submissions here.

    Balance - one of the community-submitted wallpapers.

    Balance – one of the community-submitted wallpapers.

  4. A new panel layout.  As featured below: [Whisker Menu] [Window Buttons] [Notification Area] [Indicator Plugin] [Clock]

    A new panel layout, whisker menu, and updated indicator stack.

    A new panel layout, whisker menu, and updated indicator stack.

  5. “Whisker Menu”, a modern menu applet, is included by default.
  6. The indicator stack has been updated.  Network, Power, and Sound are included and fully functional.
  7. The themes included come from the popular Shimmer Project and Numix Project. Albatross (Shimmer Project) Bluebird (Shimmer Project) Greybird (Shimmer Project) Numix (Numix Project) Orion (Shimmer Project)

Application Updates

  1. Xscreensaver has been removed in favor of Light Locker.  Light Locker uses LightDM to lock the screen, merging the functionality of the login screen and the lock screen.  Light Locker Settings is included to make configuration a simple task.

    A simple configuration utility to complement Light Locker.

    A simple configuration utility to complement Light Locker.

  2. Mugshot, the simple user configuration utility, is now included by default.

    Mugshot with the latest Greybird theme.

    Mugshot with the latest Greybird theme.

  3. The Alacarte menu editor has been removed in favor of MenuLibre.

    MenuLibre with the latest Greybird theme.

    MenuLibre with the latest Greybird theme.

  4. Parole Media Player’s plugins are once-again fully-functional.

    Parole's plugins work again in Ubuntu 14.04

    Parole’s plugins work again in Ubuntu 14.04

New Xfce Features

  1. The Xfce Display Settings now supports monitor hotplugging.

    The Xfce Display Settings can now automatically configure a newly connected display.

    The Xfce Display Settings can now automatically configure a newly connected display.

  2. The Xfce Compositor now supports zooming.  Just hold Alt and scroll the mousewheel up or down.

Keyboard Shortcuts

  1. Xubuntu 14.04 features more keyboard shortcuts and better compatibility with multimedia keyboards.
    • Web Browser: WWW or Home Page or Super+W
    • Mail Reader: Mail or Super+M
    • File Manager: My Computer or Super+F
    • Terminal: Super+T or Ctrl+Alt+T
    • Display Settings: Display or Super+P
    • gmusicbrowser: Music
    • Calculator: Calculator
    • Pidgin: Messenger
    • xkill: Ctrl+Alt+Escape
on April 16, 2014 01:27 AM

April 15, 2014

My new home office

As of the beginning of the April I am a Xamarin (that is what Xamarin employees call themselves).

At Xummit I met the rest of the Xamarins and I had an incredible time there (dare I say magical ♥).
I met old friends like Rodrigo Moya, Jason Smith, David Siegel, Cody Russell, Neil Patel, Connor Curran, Gord Allot and others, but also made new friends:

  • Zack Gramana: The right amount of crazy and creative. He is helping me with my new pet project.
  • Seth Rosetter: SF chilled out hacker with an ear for techno and extreme positive attitude, a delight to hang out with.
  • Mike Krüger: One of the friendliest people I got to meet and know with exactly my kind of humour.
  • Victoria Grothey: Incredibly nice person with lots of energy and always smiling.
  • Marek Safar: The most passionate beer expert I know I guess. Also rumour has it that either I am stalking him or he is stalking me.
  • Václav Vančura: An awesome designer who motivated me to start drawing again. Thanks for that. And many many more.

One thing I believe in, is that interpersonal relationships between co-workers is a must for a community or a company to be productive and successful. Xamarin promoted (and still promotes) this positive habit, achieved it and even more. The upbeat attitude and enthusiasm at Xamarin is infectious. Combined with the diversity in culture as well as stuff/tasks to do brings the best out of Xamarins. I will not forget the bus ride to the venue. 8 people with 7 different nationalities, but all happy and psyched about what they are doing and what others are doing ♥.

Since I joined Xamarin I started doing more Mono in my free time too. Currently I am porting

Synapse to Mac (since I loved the interface and some of the functionalities I couldn’t find in Alfred and Quicksilver). Here is a small very early sneak peak :)

Synapse for Mac in the making

I am loving Xamarin and all its stands for and brings to the table.

P.S: Hylke Bons has a fan base here at Xamarin :)

on April 15, 2014 06:30 PM

Meeting Minutes

IRC Log of the meeting.

Meeting minutes.

Agenda

20140415 Meeting Agenda


ARM Status

Nothing new to report this week


Release Metrics and Incoming Bugs

Release metrics and incoming bug data can be reviewed at the following link:

http://people.canonical.com/~kernel/reports/kt-meeting.txt


Milestone Targeted Work Items

   apw    core-1311-kernel    4 work items   
      core-1311-cross-compilation    2 work items   
      core-1311-hwe-plans    1 work item   
   ogasawara    core-1403-hwe-stack-eol-notifications    2 work items   
   smb    servercloud-1311-openstack-virt    3 work items   


Status: Trusty Development Kernel

The 3.13.0-24.46 Ubuntu kernel in the Trusty archive is currently based on the v3.13.9 upstream stable kernel. The kernel is currently frozen
in preparation for our final 14.04 release this Thurs Apr 17. kernel.
We do not anticipate any uploads between now and Thurs. All patches
from here on out are subject to our Ubuntu SRU policy.
—–
Important upcoming dates:
Thurs Apr 17 – Ubuntu 14.04 Final Release (~2 days away)


Status: CVE’s

The current CVE status can be reviewed at the following link:

http://people.canonical.com/~kernel/cve/pkg/ALL-linux.html


Status: Stable, Security, and Bugfix Kernel Updates – Saucy/Raring/Quantal/Precise/Lucid

Status for the main kernels, until today (Mar. 25):

  • Lucid – Verification and Testing
  • Precise – Verification and Testing
  • Quantal – Verification and Testing
  • Saucy – Verification and Testing

    Current opened tracking bugs details:

  • http://people.canonical.com/~kernel/reports/kernel-sru-workflow.html

    For SRUs, SRU report is a good source of information:

  • http://people.canonical.com/~kernel/reports/sru-report.html

    Schedule:

    cycle: 30-Mar through 26-Apr
    ====================================================================
    28-Mar Last day for kernel commits for this cycle
    30-Mar – 05-Apr Kernel prep week.
    06-Apr – 12-Apr Bug verification & Regression testing.
    17-Apr 14.04 Released
    13-Apr – 26-Apr Regression testing & Release to -updates.


Vote on upload rights for kamal.

https://wiki.ubuntu.com/KamalMostafa/KernelPPUApplication

(ogasawara> <apw) "kamal has shown himself to have a keen eye for detail, and a
strong sense of when to ask for help. I have no hesitations in
accepting him into the team. +1"
^^ from apw

Application approved.


Open Discussion or Questions? Raise your hand to be recognized

No open discussion.

on April 15, 2014 05:14 PM

PlainBox Target Device

Zygmunt Krynicki


The plainbox-0.6 milestone is full of content but one thing I want to point out is the CEP-4 blueprint. In short, you will be able to run PlainBox on a desktop or laptop computer but execute tests on a server or tablet device you can connect to over ssh or adb.

I'd like to solicit comments and feedback on the proposed design. Development has started but so far just in R&D mode, to check the limitations of adb and see how the proposed design really fits into the current architecture.

So, if you are interested in device or server testing, have a look at the specification (linked from the blueprint) and discuss this in checkbox-dev@lists.launchpad.net. Please help us help you better.
on April 15, 2014 10:19 AM

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on April 15, 2014 03:41 AM

We had some requests to get GHC (the Glasgow Haskell Compiler) up and running on two new Ubuntu architectures: arm64, added in 13.10, and ppc64el, added in 14.04. This has been something of a saga, and has involved rather more late-night hacking than is probably good for me.

Book the First: Recalled to a life of strange build systems

You might not know it from the sheer bulk of uploads I do sometimes, but I actually don't speak a word of Haskell and it's not very high up my list of things to learn. But I am a pretty experienced build engineer, and I enjoy porting things to new architectures: I'm firmly of the belief that breadth of architecture support is a good way to shake out certain categories of issues in code, that it's worth doing aggressively across an entire distribution, and that, even if you don't think you need something now, new requirements have a habit of coming along when you least expect them and you might as well be prepared in advance. Furthermore, it annoys me when we have excessive noise in our build failure and proposed-migration output and I often put bits and pieces of spare time into gardening miscellaneous problems there, and at one point there was a lot of Haskell stuff on the list and it got a bit annoying to have to keep sending patches rather than just fixing things myself, and ... well, I ended up as probably the only non-Haskell-programmer on the Debian Haskell team and found myself fixing problems there in my free time. Life is a bit weird sometimes.

Bootstrapping packages on a new architecture is a bit of a black art that only a fairly small number of relatively bitter and twisted people know very much about. Doing it in Ubuntu is specifically painful because we've always forbidden direct binary uploads: all binaries have to come from a build daemon. Compilers in particular often tend to be written in the language they compile, and it's not uncommon for them to build-depend on themselves: that is, you need a previous version of the compiler to build the compiler, stretching back to the dawn of time where somebody put things together with a big magnet or something. So how do you get started on a new architecture? Well, what we do in this case is we construct a binary somehow (usually involving cross-compilation) and insert it as a build-dependency for a proper build in Launchpad. The ability to do this is restricted to a small group of Canonical employees, partly because it's very easy to make mistakes and partly because things like the classic "Reflections on Trusting Trust" are in the backs of our minds somewhere. We have an iron rule for our own sanity that the injected build-dependencies must themselves have been built from the unmodified source package in Ubuntu, although there can be source modifications further back in the chain. Fortunately, we don't need to do this very often, but it does mean that as somebody who can do it I feel an obligation to try and unblock other people where I can.

As far as constructing those build-dependencies goes, sometimes we look for binaries built by other distributions (particularly Debian), and that's pretty straightforward. In this case, though, these two architectures are pretty new and the Debian ports are only just getting going, and as far as I can tell none of the other distributions with active arm64 or ppc64el ports (or trivial name variants) has got as far as porting GHC yet. Well, OK. This was somewhere around the Christmas holidays and I had some time. Muggins here cracks his knuckles and decides to have a go at bootstrapping it from scratch. It can't be that hard, right? Not to mention that it was a blocker for over 600 entries on that build failure list I mentioned, which is definitely enough to make me sit up and take notice; we'd even had the odd customer request for it.

Several attempts later and I was starting to doubt my sanity, not least for trying in the first place. We ship GHC 7.6, and upgrading to 7.8 is not a project I'd like to tackle until the much more experienced Haskell folks in Debian have switched to it in unstable. The porting documentation for 7.6 has bitrotted more or less beyond usability, and the corresponding documentation for 7.8 really isn't backportable to 7.6. I tried building 7.8 for ppc64el anyway, picking that on the basis that we had quicker hardware for it and didn't seem likely to be particularly more arduous than arm64 (ho ho), and I even got to the point of having a cross-built stage2 compiler (stage1, in the cross-building case, is a GHC binary that runs on your starting architecture and generates code for your target architecture) that I could copy over to a ppc64el box and try to use as the base for a fully-native build, but it segfaulted incomprehensibly just after spawning any child process. Compilers tend to do rather a lot, especially when they're built to use GCC to generate object code, so this was a pretty serious problem, and it resisted analysis. I poked at it for a while but didn't get anywhere, and I had other things to do so declared it a write-off and gave up.

Book the Second: The golden thread of progress

In March, another mailing list conversation prodded me into finding a blog entry by Karel Gardas on building GHC for arm64. This was enough to be worth another look, and indeed it turned out that (with some help from Karel in private mail) I was able to cross-build a compiler that actually worked and could be used to run a fully-native build that also worked. Of course this was 7.8, since as I mentioned cross-building 7.6 is unrealistically difficult unless you're considerably more of an expert on GHC's labyrinthine build system than I am. OK, no problem, right? Getting a GHC at all is the hard bit, and 7.8 must be at least as capable as 7.6, so it should be able to build 7.6 easily enough ...

Not so much. What I'd missed here was that compiler engineers generally only care very much about building the compiler with older versions of itself, and if the language in question has any kind of deprecation cycle then the compiler itself is likely to be behind on various things compared to more typical code since it has to be buildable with older versions. This means that the removal of some deprecated interfaces from 7.8 posed a problem, as did some changes in certain primops that had gained an associated compatibility layer in 7.8 but nobody had gone back to put the corresponding compatibility layer into 7.6. GHC supports running Haskell code through the C preprocessor, and there's a __GLASGOW_HASKELL__ definition with the compiler's version number, so this was just a slog tracking down changes in git and adding #ifdef-guarded code that coped with the newer compiler (remembering that stage1 will be built with 7.8 and stage2 with stage1, i.e. 7.6, from the same source tree). More inscrutably, GHC has its own packaging system called Cabal which is also used by the compiler build process to determine which subpackages to build and how to link them against each other, and some crucial subpackages weren't being built: it looked like it was stuck on picking versions from "stage0" (i.e. the initial compiler used as an input to the whole process) when it should have been building its own. Eventually I figured out that this was because GHC's use of its packaging system hadn't anticipated this case, and was selecting the higher version of the ghc package itself from stage0 rather than the version it was about to build for itself, and thus never actually tried to build most of the compiler. Editing ghc_stage1_DEPS in ghc/stage1/package-data.mk after its initial generation sorted this out. One late night building round and round in circles for a while until I had something stable, and a Debian source upload to add basic support for the architecture name (and other changes which were a bit over the top in retrospect: I didn't need to touch the embedded copy of libffi, as we build with the system one), and I was able to feed this all into Launchpad and watch the builders munch away very satisfyingly at the Haskell library stack for a while.

This was all interesting, and finally all that work was actually paying off in terms of getting to watch a slew of several hundred build failures vanish from arm64 (the final count was something like 640, I think). The fly in the ointment was that ppc64el was still blocked, as the problem there wasn't building 7.6, it was getting a working 7.8. But now I really did have other much more urgent things to do, so I figured I just wouldn't get to this by release time and stuck it on the figurative shelf.

Book the Third: The track of a bug

Then, last Friday, I cleared out my urgent pile and thought I'd have another quick look. (I get a bit obsessive about things like this that smell of "interesting intellectual puzzle".) slyfox on the #ghc IRC channel gave me some general debugging advice and, particularly usefully, a reduced example program that I could use to debug just the process-spawning problem without having to wade through noise from running the rest of the compiler. I reproduced the same problem there, and then found that the program crashed earlier (in stg_ap_0_fast, part of the run-time system) if I compiled it with +RTS -Da -RTS. I nailed it down to a small enough region of assembly that I could see all of the assembly, the source code, and an intermediate representation or two from the compiler, and then started meditating on what makes ppc64el special.

You see, the vast majority of porting bugs come down to what I might call gross properties of the architecture. You have things like whether it's 32-bit or 64-bit, big-endian or little-endian, whether char is signed or unsigned, that sort of thing. There's a big table on the Debian wiki that handily summarises most of the important ones. Sometimes you have to deal with distribution-specific things like whether GL or GLES is used; often, especially for new variants of existing architectures, you have to cope with foolish configure scripts that think they can guess certain things from the architecture name and get it wrong (assuming that powerpc* means big-endian, for instance). We often have to update config.guess and config.sub, and on ppc64el we have the additional hassle of updating libtool macros too. But I've done a lot of this stuff and I'd accounted for everything I could think of. ppc64el is actually a lot like amd64 in terms of many of these porting-relevant properties, and not even that far off arm64 which I'd just successfully ported GHC to, so I couldn't be dealing with anything particularly obvious. There was some hand-written assembly which certainly could have been problematic, but I'd carefully checked that this wasn't being used by the "unregisterised" (no specialised machine dependencies, so relatively easy to port but not well-optimised) build I was using. A problem around spawning processes suggested a problem with SIGCHLD handling, but I ruled that out by slowing down the first child process that it spawned and using strace to confirm that SIGSEGV was the first signal received. What on earth was the problem?

From some painstaking gdb work, one thing I eventually noticed was that stg_ap_0_fast's local stack appeared to be being corrupted by a function call, specifically a call to the colourfully-named debugBelch. Now, when IBM's toolchain engineers were putting together ppc64el based on ppc64, they took the opportunity to fix a number of problems with their ABI: there's an OpenJDK bug with a handy list of references. One of the things I noticed there was that there were some stack allocation optimisations in the new ABI, which affected functions that don't call any vararg functions and don't call any functions that take enough parameters that some of them have to be passed on the stack rather than in registers. debugBelch takes varargs: hmm. Now, the calling code isn't quite in C as such, but in a related dialect called "Cmm", a variant of C-- (yes, minus), that GHC uses to help bridge the gap between the functional world and its code generation, and which is compiled down to C by GHC. When importing C functions into Cmm, GHC generates prototypes for them, but it doesn't do enough parsing to work out the true prototype; instead, they all just get something like extern StgFunPtr f(void);. In most architectures you can get away with this, because the arguments get passed in the usual calling convention anyway and it all works out, but on ppc64el this means that the caller doesn't generate enough stack space and then the callee tries to save its varargs onto the stack in an area that in fact belongs to the caller, and suddenly everything goes south. Things were starting to make sense.

Now, debugBelch is only used in optional debugging code; but runInteractiveProcess (the function associated with the initial round of failures) takes no fewer than twelve arguments, plenty to force some of them onto the stack. I poked around the GCC patch for this ABI change a bit and determined that it only optimised away the stack allocation if it had a full prototype for all the callees, so I guessed that changing those prototypes to extern StgFunPtr f(); might work: it's still technically wrong, not least because omitting the parameter list is an obsolescent feature in C11, but it's at least just omitting information about the parameter list rather than actively lying about it. I tweaked that and ran the cross-build from scratch again. Lo and behold, suddenly I had a working compiler, and I could go through the same build-7.6-using-7.8 procedure as with arm64, much more quickly this time now that I knew what I was doing. One upstream bug, one Debian upload, and several bootstrapping builds later, and GHC was up and running on another architecture in Launchpad. Success!

Epilogue

There's still more to do. I gather there may be a Google Summer of Code project in Linaro to write proper native code generation for GHC on arm64: this would make things a good deal faster, but also enable GHCi (the interpreter) and Template Haskell, and thus clear quite a few more build failures. Since there's already native code generation for ppc64 in GHC, getting it going for ppc64el would probably only be a couple of days' work at this point. But these are niceties by comparison, and I'm more than happy with what I got working for 14.04.

The upshot of all of this is that I may be the first non-Haskell-programmer to ever port GHC to two entirely new architectures. I'm not sure if I gain much from that personally aside from a lot of lost sleep and being considered extremely strange. It has, however, been by far the most challenging set of packages I've ported, and a fascinating trip through some odd corners of build systems and undefined behaviour that I don't normally need to touch.

on April 15, 2014 01:45 AM